Images: H.A Bennets & UTZ

It’s that time of month when we profile our single origin coffee of the month and this time around, it’s Kenya! This bean provokes a lot of excitement in the coffee community because it’s so highly sought after. Before we ‘dissect’ the Kenyan coffee bean, let’s go back in time to where it all began…

History

It was Kenya, 1900. The nation was tea-crazy. They had never heard of a thing called coffee, until… the English arrived sipping on a latte. Well, almost. Apparently it was the English that brought the ‘good stuff’ to Kenya, although others say it was the French Holy Ghost Fathers who introduced it to Reunion Island. Whoever it was, the coffee drinkers of the world are surely thankful because the coffees coming out of Kenyan are some of the best in the world.

The Coffee Board was established in January 1933 – a body that issued licenses to coffee farmers. This led to the Government-run Coffee Auctions being established, providing transparency, competition and a fair price for coffee farmers. This auction system is why many believe that the Kenyan coffee industry has been so successful, as it’s a system that rewards quality with higher prices in the market place.

So, why is Kenyan coffee so good?

Quality

Kenyan coffee is grown in near-perfect conditions. The volcanic soil has a well-balanced acidity with just the right levels of rainfall and sunshine. Plants are grown between 1400 to 2000 metres above sea level (find out why altitude matters here).

Most Kenyan beans are processed using the wet method (discover all about processing techniques here). This is the best method to retain high quality and flavour notes. The Coffee Board assesses beans from all farms to ensure high standards are maintained.

Competition

Demand for Kenya’s coffee beans is high and that’s the way they like it. They are considered of such quality that many of them are sold in micro-lots in the auction to the highest bidder. No back room deals here. This makes them some of the world’s most expensive coffees.

Taste

This amazing bean has a lovely syrupy texture from start to finish. It has berry, apricot and orange flavours on first taste. Then it all changes to delicate floral notes with a citrus acidity finishing up with a long sweet sticky texture with a hint of cocoa.

Kenyan coffees are typically clean tasting and are great for plunger and filter coffees.

Can you taste it?

SG-xmas-kenya

Keen to try it? Get in quick and order our Kenya AB Monarch single origin coffee, strictly for a limited time.

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Emma Watson

From creating her own ‘Ozzie Mozzie Editorial’ newspaper when she was 10 to writing for ‘The Sydney Morning Herald’, Emma has always loved to write. She spends her time looking after her two kids and tapping away at the keyboard blogging at filmandfood.com.au, writing for Howards Storage World and of course, for Sacred Grounds Organic. Her love of a good small cappuccino (with one sugar!) and social justice makes this a match made in heaven. Emma loves a good book, travelling and hanging at the beach with her little crew.

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