Baristas are amazing aren’t they? They just have the skill and the know-how to make the perfect cup of coffee every time, making it look so easy. But alas, when us non-Baristas try to do the same at home we end up with super-fluffy or drab and runny milk on our average coffee. Argh! It’s enough to make you want to throw your coffee machine out the window and run down to your local cafe… in your jarmies!

Well, don’t despair, we have just the thing for you and it comes with awesome graphics. Dig in!

How to Texture Milk Like a Barista

Flat White

Now a Flat White, as the name suggests has only a thin layer of frothed milk on top. To achieve this,  Flat White milk requires a lot less aeration and more heating than cappuccino or latte drinks. When aerating the milk you want the tip of the steam wand just under the surface so that some air can get into the milk. If the milk is bubbling then your steam wand is getting too much air. If your steam wand is making a screeching sound then there is not enough air getting in. You should hear a slurping noise. When the milk has just hit the ‘warm’ mark you plunge the steam wand further under the surface of the milk and hold it there until the jug feels too hot to hold.

Latte

A lot of people think that a Flat White and a Latte are the same thing but they’re actually quite different. Lattes have a thicker layer on froth on top and so they require the milk to be aerated for a lot longer than the Flat White in order to create more froth. This provides more of a creamy texture, similar to a Cappuccino.

Again, similarly to the Flatwhite , when aerating the milk you want the tip of the steam wand just under the surface so that some air can get into the milk. If the milk is bubbling then your steam wand is getting too much air. If your steam wand is making a screeching sound then there is not enough air getting in. You should hear a slurping noise. To allow for more froth to form, you want to hold the the tip of the steam just under the surface of the milk until it’s just hot and then submerge under until the jug is too hot to hold.

Cappuccino

When you think about making a Cappuccino mentally divide your favourite coffee cup into thirds and use 1/3 espresso, 1/3 steamed milk and 1/3 froth. This handy little fraction will never let you down. The other more obvious difference is that powdered choccy is used on top.  To texture the milk  and to create enough froth, make sure you maintain the aeration stage (ie keep the steam wand near the top of the jug) until it’s feeling quite warm, then plunge the steam wand further under the surface of the milk and hold it there until the jug feels too hot to hold.

 

 

Ask us your questions! What aspect of home coffee-making do you find most difficult?

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Emma Watson

From creating her own ‘Ozzie Mozzie Editorial’ newspaper when she was 10 to writing for ‘The Sydney Morning Herald’, Emma has always loved to write. She spends her time looking after her two kids and tapping away at the keyboard blogging at filmandfood.com.au, writing for Howards Storage World and of course, for Sacred Grounds Organic. Her love of a good small cappuccino (with one sugar!) and social justice makes this a match made in heaven. Emma loves a good book, travelling and hanging at the beach with her little crew.

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